Additive colour

Additive colour involves mixing different wavelengths of light to produce other colours.

  • Whilst additive colour is the method used to mix wavelengths of light, subtractive colour is the method used to mix dyes, inks and paints.
  • An additive approach to colour is used in the case of emission of light from the (black) screens of mobile phones, computers and televisions.
  • An additive approach to colour is used in the case of the reflection of light off-white, neutral or black surfaces by digital projectors.
  • RGB colour is an additive colour model that combines wavelengths of light corresponding with red, green and blue primary colours to produce other colours.
  • Red, green and blue are called additive primary colours in an RGB colour model because they can be added together to produce all other colours.
  • RGB colour uses three light sources or beams. Each is called a component of the resulting colour.
  • Different colours are produced by varying the intensity of the component colours between fully off and fully on.
  • When fully saturated red, green and blue primary colours are combined, they produce white.
  • When any two fully saturated additive primaries are combined, they produce a secondary colour: yellow, cyan and magenta.
  • Some RGB colour models can produce over 16 million colours by varying the proportion and intensity of each of the three primary colours.
  • The additive RGB colour model cannot be used for mixing different colours of pigments, paints, inks, dyes or powder. To understand these colourants see subtractive colour.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Additive_color