Visible light

Visible light is the range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation perceived as colour by a human observer.

  • Visible light is a form of electromagnetic radiation.
  • The range of wavelengths that produce visible light is a very small part of the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Other forms of electromagnetic radiation include radio waves, microwaves, infrared, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays.
  • Visible light is perceived by a human observer as all the spectral colours between red and violet plus all the other colours that result from combining them together in different proportions.
  • The complete range of colours that can be perceived by a human observer is called the visible spectrum.

Visible light

Visible light is a form of electromagnetic radiation.

  • Visible light is the range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation that are perceived as colour by a human observer.
  • The range of wavelengths that produce visible light is a very small part of the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Other forms of electromagnetic radiation include radio waves, microwaves, infrared, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays.
  • Visible light is perceived by a human observer as all the spectral colours between red and violet plus all the other colours that result from mixing them together in different proportions.
  • The complete range of colours that can be perceived by a human observer is called the visible spectrum.

Visible spectrum

The visible spectrum is the range of wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum that correspond with all the different colours we see in the world.

  • Human beings don’t see wavelengths of visible light, but they do see the spectral colours that correspond with each wavelength and colours produced when different wavelengths are combined.
  • The visible spectrum includes all the spectral colours between red and violet and each is produced by a single wavelength.
  • The visible spectrum is often divided into named colours, though any division is somewhat arbitrary.
  • Traditional colours in English include: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet.
  • The visible spectrum is continuous, and the human eye can distinguish many thousands of spectral colours.
  • The fact that we see distinct bands of colour in a rainbow is an artefact of human colour vision.
  • The visible spectrum is a small part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visible_spectrum

Visible spectrum

The visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum is called the visible spectrum.

  • The visible spectrum is the range of wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum that correspond with all the different colours we see in the world.
  • As light travels through the air it is invisible to our eyes.
  • Human beings don’t see wavelengths of light, but they do see the spectral colours that correspond with each wavelength and colours produced when different wavelengths are combined.
  • The visible spectrum includes all the spectral colours between red and violet and each is produced by a single wavelength.
  • The visible spectrum is often divided into named colours, though any division of this kind is somewhat arbitrary.
  • Traditional colours referred to in English include red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet.

Visual perception

Visual perception is the human ability to see and interpret the surrounding environment because of the sensitivity of the eyes to wavelengths of light corresponding to all the colours we see between red and violet.

  • The human eye and so human visual perception are tuned to the visible spectrum and so to colours between red and violet. Light, however, is rarely of a single wavelength, so an observer will usually be exposed to a range of different wavelengths of light or a mixture of wavelengths from different areas of the spectrum.
  • There are no properties of electromagnetic radiation that distinguish visible light from other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Visual perception is associated with eyesight but also usually refers to the brain’s ability to make sense of what our eyes see.
  • The human eye and so human vision are tuned to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Colour is not a property of electromagnetic radiation, but a feature of the visual perception of an observer.
  • Colour is what human beings see in the presence of light.
  • Objects appear to be different colours to an observer depending on the wavelengths, frequencies and amplitude of light at the moment it strikes the retina at the back of the eye.

Visual perception

Colour is not a property of electromagnetic radiation, but a feature of visual perception by an observer.