Incident

Incident light refers to incoming light that is travelling towards an object or medium.

  • Incident light refers to light travelling towards something but is often visualised as a single ray.
  • A ray diagram (or wave diagram) uses drawing conventions and labels to visualise the path that a single ray (or wave) of light might take as it encounters different media, materials or objects.
  • An incident ray (or wave) and its direction of travel is usually shown on a diagram as it propagates through a first medium, prior to encountering a second medium.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_(optics)#Interaction_with_surfaces

Internal reflection

Internal reflection takes place when light travelling through a medium such as water fails to cross the boundary into another transparent medium such as air. The light reflects back off the boundary between the two media.

  • Internal reflection is a common phenomenon so far as visible light is concerned but occurs with all types of electromagnetic radiation.
  • For internal refraction to occur, the refractive index of the second medium must be lower than the refractive index of the first medium. So internal reflection takes place when light reaches air from glass or water (at an angle greater than the critical angle), but not when light reaches glass from air.
  • In most everyday situations light is partially refracted and partially reflected at the boundary between water (or glass) and air because of irregularities in the surface.
  • If the angle at which light strikes the boundary between water (or glass) and air is less than a certain critical angle, then the light will be refracted as it crosses the boundary between the two media.
  • When light strikes the boundary between two media precisely at the critical angle, then light is neither refracted or reflected but is instead transmitted along the boundary between the two media.
  • However, if the angle of incidence is greater than the critical angle for all points at which light strikes the boundary then no light will cross the boundary, but will instead undergo total internal reflection.
  • The critical angle is the angle of incidence above which internal reflection occurs. The angle is measured with respect to the normal at the boundary between two media.
  • The angle of refraction is measured between a ray of light and an imaginary line called the normal.
  • In optics, the normal is an imaginary line drawn on a ray diagram perpendicular to, so at a right angle to (900), to the boundary between two media.
  • If the boundary between the media is curved then the normal is drawn perpendicular to the boundary.

Internal reflection

Internal reflection takes place when light travelling through a medium such as water fails to cross the boundary into another transparent medium such as air. The light reflects back off the boundary between the two media.

  • Internal reflection is a common phenomenon so far as visible light is concerned but occurs with all types of electromagnetic radiation.
  • For internal refraction to occur, the refractive index of the second medium must be lower than the refractive index of the first medium. So internal reflection takes place when light reaches air from glass or water (at an angle greater than the critical angle), but not when light reaches glass from air.
  • In most everyday situations light is partially refracted and partially reflected at the boundary between water (or glass) and air because of irregularities in the surface.
  • If the angle at which light strikes the boundary between water (or glass) and air is less than a certain critical angle, then the light will be refracted as it crosses the boundary between the two media.
  • When light strikes the boundary between two media precisely at the critical angle, then light is neither refracted or reflected but is instead transmitted along the boundary between the two media.
  • However, if the angle of incidence is greater than the critical angle for all points at which light strikes the boundary then no light will cross the boundary, but will instead undergo total internal reflection.
  • The critical angle is the angle of incidence above which internal reflection occurs. The angle is measured with respect to the normal at the boundary between two media.
  • The angle of refraction is measured between a ray of light and an imaginary line called the normal.
  • In optics, the normal is an imaginary line drawn on a ray diagram perpendicular to, so at a right angle to (900), to the boundary between two media.
  • If the boundary between the media is curved then the normal is drawn perpendicular to the boundary.

Joule

joule is a derived unit of energy in the International System of Units.

  • A joule is equal to the energy transferred to (or work done on) an object when a force of one newton acts on that object in the direction of its motion through a distance of one metre(1 newton/metre or N⋅m).
  • It is also the energy dissipated as heat when an electric current of one ampere passes through a resistance of one ohm for one second.
  • Where symbol kg is a kilogram, m is a metre, s is a second, N is a newton, Pa is a pascal, W is a watt,  and V is the volt, then the symbol J is for joule.

 

Electronvolt prefixes Abbreviation   eV to joules
millielectronvolt meV 1 eV = 0.001
electronvolt eV  1 eV = 1 eV
kiloelectronvolt keV 1x keV =1,000 eV
megaelectronvolt MeV 1x MeV = 1,000,000
gigaelectronvolt GeV 1x GeV = 1,000,000,000  1x GeV = 0.00000016021773
teraelectronvolt TeV 1x TeV = 1,000,000,000,000 1x TeV = 1.6021773e-7
petaelectronvolt PeV 1x PeV = 1,000,000,000,000,000 1x PeV = 0.00016021773
exaelectronvolt EeV 1x EeV =1,000,000,000,000,000,000 1x EeV = 0.16021773

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joule